The story of the hurricane …

Bob Dylan explained it once, but I’ll explain the natural phenomenon from another angled. A hurricane develops due to the hot, hot air temperatures of summer moving along the hot, hot ocean. This collision of heat joins forces to form a mass of air and water that starts swirling, blowing, sinking, and rising in a path that you see on the weatherman tracking device.

You probably begin paying attention to the tracking system when a hurricane begins to move close to the shore. A hurricane close to shore will undoubtedly cause massive storm surges. A storm surge is when the ocean may increase its high tides above what it normally may be. It is not uncommon to have a storm surge of 25 feet (about 6 kids standing on top of each others shoulders)!

The wind speed of the hurricane can get up to 150-200 miles per hour! Even once the winds slow down to next-to-nothing, it is important to remember that they are going to start back up again – but, go in the opposite direction. The respite you experienced was the ‘eye’ of the storm. A hurricane is a big doughnut of wind and water constantly cycling around destroying everything in its path. It can be up to 300 miles across.

Image (c) environment.nationalgeographic.com

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Do sharks really never stop moving?

In order to breathe sharks have to keep moving. They have to engulf water to extract the oxygen in the water and then the rest of the water filters out of their gills. If the water current is very strong they can stay still.

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No, sharks do not have a sixth sense

Sharks really do have a sixth sense.

It is the electrosensory organ that we spoke of with the hammerhead sharks. The electrosensory organ is called the ampullae of Lorenzini. Sounds intimidating, however, it’s really just a jelly filled canal that starts near the nose and helps them find food under the sand and figure out what direction they are going.

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What is the best book about the ocean?

That seems like a fun question. And, worthwhile, especially since we wrote about the best beach movies this winter. But…Are we talking non-fiction or fiction? Let’s just say for the sake of relaxation you are asking about fiction. I can name some that come to mind, but, would love to hear feedback from others as well!Moby_Dick_by_KissMyShades

Here is my list:

Jaws by Peter Benchley

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

I am sure there are many more that I have yet to read…please add your favorites to the comment section. Thanks!

Has anyone read Robinson Crusoe by Robert Louis Stevenson? I feel like that would be worthy of the list, but, don’t want to say I read it when I never did…

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image (c) deviantart.com

Oh, Bermuda Triangle, where art thou?

bermuda-triangle

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Image (c) behindblondiepark.com

How many oceans are there?

In reality, there is just one ocean.

However, I understand the confusion as of late on the geographic names applied to different sections of this ocean ecosystem. While we lost a planet (Pluto), we gained an ocean! In 2000, the International Hydrographic Organization named this new ocean the Southern Ocean. Basically, it is the southern equivalent of the Arctic Ocean, except a little bit larger in sprawling space. So, there are 5 oceans.

Here they are in a listing of greatest to least in square miles:

Pacific (64,186,000)

Atlantic (33,420,000)

Indian (28,350,000)

Southern (7,848,300)

Arctic (5,106,000)

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When did life begin in the ocean?

Actually, before there was life on land there was life in the ocean. Life in the ocean began about 3.1 to 3.4 billion years ago. Life on land began only 400 million years ago.

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How do you say ocean in … ?

Czech … oceánu

Dutch … ocean

Bulgarian … океан

Filipino … karagatan

Finnish … meressä

German … ozean

Hungarian … ocean

Indonesian … samudra

Italian … oceano

Latvian … okeāna

Lithuanian … vandenynas

Maltese … oċean

Polish … oceanu

Portuguese … oceano

Spanish … océano

Turkish … okyanus

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What am I?

Here are some clues:protozoa

Lives at the surface of the ocean.

It is only one cell.

It is an animal that eats, breathes and moves like any other animal.

The blue rays in the center hold algae.

You can find it at the American Museum of Natural History.

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Why do you hear the ocean echo from a shell?

The larger the seashell the louder the sound, right? It is the space inside the shell that creates the sound. Well, the space inside the seashell bouncing against the sounds of your surroundings.

For the most part people are experimenting with this seashell symphony at the beach where there is a lot of  space for sounds to resonate inside the seashell.

It would be the same type of sound when you put a glass up to your ear. It you put a glass up to your ear in the bathroom with the door shut you will hear very little. If you put the glass up to your ear outside, you will hear the “ocean”.

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